Military & Aerospace History

This portion of our site is dedicated to the people and technology that have shaped military and aerospace history. Posts will be as simple as historic picture of the day to in-depth interviews. If you have an interesting story you’d like to share, please let us know.

Military & Aerospace History
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Tim Huetter, spokesman for the Museum of Flight in Seattle, discusses the Red Barn, the building where The Boeing Company was born and where some of the history’s most iconic military and commercial aircraft were designed with Defense & Aerospace Report Editor Vago Muradian. Boeing donated the building to the Museum of Flight at Boeing Field.

Military & Aerospace History
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In February 1861, U.S. Army Assistant Surgeon Bernard J.D. Irwin defied long distance and a snow storm to ensure that soldiers wounded in the nation’s first major battle with the Apaches at Apache Pass, Arizona, could get medical care. He then joined the fight and helped to break the siege, unwittingly carving his own path to the first-ever Congressional Medal of Honor in doing so.

Military & Aerospace History
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After a decade of top secret development and controversy, the B-2 stealth bomber is unveiled at a ceremony at Northrop’s plant in Palmdale, Calif. The aircraft is the most advanced jet ever made, with extensive use of composite materials, sensors and systems to reduce all aspects of its signature — radar, electronic and infrared.

Military & Aerospace History
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On Nov. 8, 1864, Read Arm. David Farragut, commander of US naval forces during the Civil War, wrote a powerful letter to Navy Secretary Gideon Welles months after the Battle of Mobile Bay that sailors, not weapons, determine the outcome of battles. Farragut, the first US naval officer to achieve the ranks of rear admiral, vice admiral and admiral, wrote: “I think the world is sadly mistaken when it supposes that battles are won by this or that kind of gun or vessel. In my humble opinion the Kearsarge would have captured or sunk the Alabama as often as they might have met under the same organization and officers. The best gun and the best vessel should certainly be chosen, but the victory three times out of four depends upon those who fight them. I do not believe that the result would have been different if the Kearsarge had had nothing but a battery of 8-inch guns and 100-pound chase rifle. What signifies the size and caliber of the gun if you do not hit your adversary?”

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